WOODLAND

Look over the bridge at Reception and you may see a Dipper flit along the burn.  As you walk up the track, with Alders and Rhododendrons on your right, keep a eye open for the little Tree-creeper bird looking for small insects on the trunks and branches. As you enter the wood, past a Silver Birch tree on your right, you will see limestone in the bank on your left, folded by volcanic activity.  The woodland is predominantly Hazel and Oak with a few Ash trees.  In spring the banks are covered with Lesser Celandine flowers, Primroses and masses of Bluebells.  Later, Red Campion and Meadow-sweet can be seen.


 


 



Bluebell






In summer, keep an eye on the side of the burn for the Grey Wagtail hunting for small insects.  If you are lucky you may see a Tawny Owl roosting next to the trunks in the larger trees.  Further up the hill you will see an Ash tree, Blackthorn and Wild Cherry (Gean) trees at the top of the bank on your left, and on your right, a fine Larch tree.  This loses its needles/leaves in the winter and is Britain's only deciduous conifer.  At the end of the fence (map G2) you can see the track where the Red Deer enter the campsite, mainly in spring and autumn, coming down by the burn from the hill. Around dusk in summer you will see Bats flying up and down the length of the wood hunting for midges and moths.

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