GRASSLAND

Starting at Reception, walk up the track.  The Alder trees on the left (map G6) are often used by Song Thrushes, Chaffinches, Greenfinches and Siskins looking for food put out by the campers.   At the top of the track, the Hawthorn hedge on the right is an important food source, providing flowers with nectar for insects in the spring, and in autumn large quantities of berries to help the birds through the winter.  In the corner (map E1), you will see one of the young Wych/Scotch Elms we planted in 1991, along with Oaks, Beeches and Sycamores, as successors to the beautiful trees we inherited on our common march with Torosay.  By the gate a mature Elm and Beech embrace like a Rodin sculpture, and just beyond are two more magnificent mature Elms.
















At the back of the field (map F3) Blackthorn and Wild Cherries (Gean) blossom in April, and Wild Roses in June.  Swallows swoop low over the grass for flies, especially just after it has been cut or in damp weather.  Black and white Pied Wagtails feed there, and Chaffinches swap friendship for a little muesli.  Moles are also active in spring.  Down the front road you’ll see more Hawthorns, and pass under a nice Rowan, also important for flowers and berries, and two young Beech trees.  The grass area at the bottom on the right is the place where Rabbits and Hedgehogs may be seen.


ChaffinchSwallow

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